Saturday, June 02, 2007

all wrapped up in a bow


It's obvious to *everyone* - including random strangers at the airport who loudly announce, "that boy is bowlegged!" to grandpa who exclaimed, "he could ride a horse all day long!" - that Z is bowlegged. Even though our pediatrician is not concerned, with J and his sister's history of wearing braces as infants to correct bowed legs, we decided to get a second opinion. We have also been concerned about the amount of calcium in his diet (he's allergic to most major sources) and saw a nutritionist a couple weeks ago.

Yesterday, we saw an orthopedic specialist at Children's Hospital. When we first arrived, they talked about drawing some blood to check levels of calcium and vitamin D. After looking at the x-rays the doctor said, "His bones are strong. I can tell he has plenty of calcium." The bright white area at the ends of his fibia and tibia is new bone growth indicating that he has good amounts of calcium, "so keep doing what you're doing."

Well, what I'm doing is still nursing. After talking with the nutritionist she said that I'm Z's best source of calcium. So, looks like I'm in this for the long haul - like, until he's 10 or something. (ha)

Z will likely always have some bow to his legs, but they should straighten out somewhat in the next couple of years. On the bowlegged spectrum, he is certainly at the far end, but they don't do braces anymore. He'll get x-rayed again in one year to check on his progress. There is a chance that he may need corrective surgery or braces in the future, but everyone's opinion at this point is, "let's wait and see."

In the meantime, we enjoy the stories about guys who have bowed legs and get excellent vert on the basketball court. It's a feature not a flaw. :)

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4 Comments:

Blogger Janet said...

My cousin was born with seriously bowed legs (he was the smaller of 2 twins). My aunt was told to do exercises with him, a sort of bicycle motion for 20 minutes or so a day. Now he's 20, and has never taken on a sport where he didn't excel.

Keep up the nursing!

4:10 PM  
Blogger Sanaz said...

Hi, my daughter is 18 months and her legs are bowed and her doctor wants her to wear a brace. How is your son's legs now and have you tried any treatment for the bowing. I am hesitant about making her wear a brace and am trying to get any advice and testimonials as I can! Thanks!!!

12:06 PM  
Blogger a said...

I have been researching to try to find some comfort and I came across your post. My 16 month old daughter has bowing of the lower legs and femurs. When she was born she kept the soles of her feet flat together and the dr. said it would go away within days. Well, months later she was still doing it and at times cutting off the circulation. We took her to a specialist that said she had "monkey toes." (Her feet and toes also curve) and that it would go away after a couple months of walking. Now after 6 months of walking it is no better so we took her to a great pediatrician whom as you said stated they do not recommend braces or shoes until after the age of 2 so give it until after then. She stated that until then we should put her in shoes that have a heel to flatten and stretch the sole of the foot and when it gets cooler put boots on her to keep the ankle straight. (with the curved tibia and fibia the ankle is usually too flexible) Are any of the foot problems familiar to you too?

7:56 PM  
Blogger a said...

I have been researching to try to find some comfort and I came across your post. My 16 month old daughter has bowing of the lower legs and femurs. When she was born she kept the soles of her feet flat together and the dr. said it would go away within days. Well, months later she was still doing it and at times cutting off the circulation. We took her to a specialist that said she had "monkey toes." (Her feet and toes also curve) and that it would go away after a couple months of walking. Now after 6 months of walking it is no better so we took her to a great pediatrician whom as you said stated they do not recommend braces or shoes until after the age of 2 so give it until after then. She stated that until then we should put her in shoes that have a heel to flatten and stretch the sole of the foot and when it gets cooler put boots on her to keep the ankle straight. (with the curved tibia and fibia the ankle is usually too flexible) Are any of the foot problems familiar to you too?

7:59 PM  

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